Gordon Matta-Clark

    Attributes

    • Male
    • Installation
    • Street art

    About the artist

    1943: Born in New York City
    1978: Died in New York City

    Gordon Matta-Clark is one of the artists most closely linked to the urban condition. Like so many other artists who settled in New York's SoHo in the late sixties, Matta-Clark became an emblem of what has on occasions been known as the 'loft situation'.

    His premature death in 1978 put an end to a career marked by a fast development of critical methods in the fields of art and architecture. His 'building cuts', consisting of aggressive interventions on the structure of derelict buildings, are still regarded as emblematic works. Splitting, 1973, Day's End, 1975, and Conical Intersect, 1975, soon became icons of urban activism.

    None of these constructions are still in existence. All that remains are photographic documents, films, drawings and, in some cases, isolated vestiges of the building. The transitory condition of this sculptural practice and its diffusion through documentary images radicalised Post-Minimalism and set the path for the tactics of Anarchitecture.