• 28 MAR
    Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam
    Otro
    MICHEL AUDER: Interview & short films

    Categoría

    • Otro
    • Contemporaneo

    Fechas y horarios

    28 MAR 2013

    from 7:30 pm until 10 pm

    Lugar del evento

    Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

    Amsterdam
    Holanda

    Información

    The Stedelijk Museum proudly presents the Dutch première of Michel Auder and Andrew Neel’s feature film “The Feature” (2008). During this special stedelijk|film evening, Auder will talk about this film (which will be shown the following day) and screen various short films from his extremely diverse and rich oeuvre dating back to the 1960s. Auder will be interviewed by curator and writer Adam Kleinman.

    Michel Auder began making films in the early 1960s. By 1968, filmmaking had become his primary practice, through his association with a constellation of radical independent filmmakers in Paris known as the Zanzibar Group. He was influenced by the French New Wave and experimental cinema, most notably Jean-Luc Godard and Andy Warhol (in fact, he was the husband of “superstar” actress Viva of the Factory before marrying photographer Cindy Sherman). In the late 1960s, Auder moved to New York City, where he has resided since. The emergence of video allowed Auder to translate Warhol’s talent for making the banal glamorous and the glamorous banal into a diary practice which Auder himself did not consider fine art. His earliest works are travel logs and endearing portraits of friends including Hannah Wilke, Alice Neel, Annie Sprinkle, Eric Bogosian, Louis Waldon, and Larry Rivers. The label “video artist” was applied retroactively to Auder when he began exhibiting his work in 1980.

    His seemingly first-person, subjective way of filming invokes a personal and intimate space. Yet Auder is a voyeur, an impersonal witness of people’s lives from a distance, or even within the intimacy he creates. These changing roles create the illusion of a documentary in a world where everything seems staged. In other works, Auder deals with history. His works are able to wake history from its slumber into something worldly, present, active, and vivid. In his version of Andy Warhol’s Chelsea Girls, for example, Warhol is no longer a static muse or deity upon which all can project their desires, but a voice on the phone, murmuring things coherent, incoherent, funny, quotidian, offensive, and absurd. In Auder’s films, mythmaking, storytelling, and history are all wrapped indistinguishably together.

    On March 28, from 7:30 pm until 10 pm, Auder will be interviewed by curator and writer Adam Kleinman, and will screen several of his older short films, such as “The Valerie Solanas Incident” (1971), “My Love” (1977), “1981 Regan” (1981), “Blind Sex” (1983), “Endless Column” (2001), and “Daytime Version of the Night” (2013).

    On March 29, at 11 am and 3 pm, Auder and Neel’s feature film “The Feature” (2008) will be screened in the Teijin Auditorium of the Stedelijk. As Nathan Lee wrote in the New York Times, 'The Feature' is a window on Michel Auder's world, based on more than 40 years of his videos.


    The Stedelijk Museum proudly presents the Dutch première of Michel Auder and Andrew Neel’s feature film “The Feature” (2008). During this special stedelijk|film evening, Auder will talk about this film (which will be shown the following day) and screen various short films from his extremely diverse and rich oeuvre dating back to the 1960s. Auder will be interviewed by curator and writer Adam Kleinman.

    Michel Auder began making films in the early 1960s. By 1968, filmmaking had become his primary practice, through his association with a constellation of radical independent filmmakers in Paris known as the Zanzibar Group. He was influenced by the French New Wave and experimental cinema, most notably Jean-Luc Godard and Andy Warhol (in fact, he was the husband of “superstar” actress Viva of the Factory before marrying photographer Cindy Sherman). In the late 1960s, Auder moved to New York City, where he has resided since. The emergence of video allowed Auder to translate Warhol’s talent for making the banal glamorous and the glamorous banal into a diary practice which Auder himself did not consider fine art. His earliest works are travel logs and endearing portraits of friends including Hannah Wilke, Alice Neel, Annie Sprinkle, Eric Bogosian, Louis Waldon, and Larry Rivers. The label “video artist” was applied retroactively to Auder when he began exhibiting his work in 1980.

    His seemingly first-person, subjective way of filming invokes a personal and intimate space. Yet Auder is a voyeur, an impersonal witness of people’s lives from a distance, or even within the intimacy he creates. These changing roles create the illusion of a documentary in a world where everything seems staged. In other works, Auder deals with history. His works are able to wake history from its slumber into something worldly, present, active, and vivid. In his version of Andy Warhol’s Chelsea Girls, for example, Warhol is no longer a static muse or deity upon which all can project their desires, but a voice on the phone, murmuring things coherent, incoherent, funny, quotidian, offensive, and absurd. In Auder’s films, mythmaking, storytelling, and history are all wrapped indistinguishably together.

    On March 28, from 7:30 pm until 10 pm, Auder will be interviewed by curator and writer Adam Kleinman, and will screen several of his older short films, such as “The Valerie Solanas Incident” (1971), “My Love” (1977), “1981 Regan” (1981), “Blind Sex” (1983), “Endless Column” (2001), and “Daytime Version of the Night” (2013).

    On March 29, at 11 am and 3 pm, Auder and Neel’s feature film “The Feature” (2008) will be screened in the Teijin Auditorium of the Stedelijk. As Nathan Lee wrote in the New York Times, 'The Feature' is a window on Michel Auder's world, based on more than 40 years of his videos.

    - See more at: http://stedelijk.nl/en/40051/film-michel-auder-interview-short-films#sthash.2dgrMrCX.dpuf

    The Stedelijk Museum proudly presents the Dutch première of Michel Auder and Andrew Neel’s feature film “The Feature” (2008). During this special stedelijk|film evening, Auder will talk about this film (which will be shown the following day) and screen various short films from his extremely diverse and rich oeuvre dating back to the 1960s. Auder will be interviewed by curator and writer Adam Kleinman.

    Michel Auder began making films in the early 1960s. By 1968, filmmaking had become his primary practice, through his association with a constellation of radical independent filmmakers in Paris known as the Zanzibar Group. He was influenced by the French New Wave and experimental cinema, most notably Jean-Luc Godard and Andy Warhol (in fact, he was the husband of “superstar” actress Viva of the Factory before marrying photographer Cindy Sherman). In the late 1960s, Auder moved to New York City, where he has resided since. The emergence of video allowed Auder to translate Warhol’s talent for making the banal glamorous and the glamorous banal into a diary practice which Auder himself did not consider fine art. His earliest works are travel logs and endearing portraits of friends including Hannah Wilke, Alice Neel, Annie Sprinkle, Eric Bogosian, Louis Waldon, and Larry Rivers. The label “video artist” was applied retroactively to Auder when he began exhibiting his work in 1980.

    His seemingly first-person, subjective way of filming invokes a personal and intimate space. Yet Auder is a voyeur, an impersonal witness of people’s lives from a distance, or even within the intimacy he creates. These changing roles create the illusion of a documentary in a world where everything seems staged. In other works, Auder deals with history. His works are able to wake history from its slumber into something worldly, present, active, and vivid. In his version of Andy Warhol’s Chelsea Girls, for example, Warhol is no longer a static muse or deity upon which all can project their desires, but a voice on the phone, murmuring things coherent, incoherent, funny, quotidian, offensive, and absurd. In Auder’s films, mythmaking, storytelling, and history are all wrapped indistinguishably together.

    On March 28, from 7:30 pm until 10 pm, Auder will be interviewed by curator and writer Adam Kleinman, and will screen several of his older short films, such as “The Valerie Solanas Incident” (1971), “My Love” (1977), “1981 Regan” (1981), “Blind Sex” (1983), “Endless Column” (2001), and “Daytime Version of the Night” (2013).

    On March 29, at 11 am and 3 pm, Auder and Neel’s feature film “The Feature” (2008) will be screened in the Teijin Auditorium of the Stedelijk. As Nathan Lee wrote in the New York Times, 'The Feature' is a window on Michel Auder's world, based on more than 40 years of his videos.

    - See more at: http://stedelijk.nl/en/40051/film-michel-auder-interview-short-films#sthash.2dgrMrCX.dpuf

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